Jane Grisewood Artist


about

 
Jane Grisewood, New Zealand-born artist and part-time lecturer/tutor was an editor and publisher in London and New York before returning to university to study art. After graduating with first-class honours, she gained her Masters and PhD at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London, where she teaches drawing. Exhibiting widely, she has received several awards, including two from the Arts Council, and has artist books in many international collections, including the Tate, V&A, MoMA, Brooklyn Museum, SAIC, Yale, and the Museum of Contemporary Art Barcelona. Recent work includes exhibitions and performances in Berlin, London, Leeds, Norwich, Lisbon and Vancouver; artist residencies in Hawaii, Arizona, Chile, and UCL; and youth art projects in London and Rio de Janeiro.

Grisewood’s practice is an ongoing exploration into time and transience, dislocation and memory, where process and movement are key. While working across media, the line, repetition and duration are recurring themes in her work, from drawing and photography to print and performance. Drawing involves her body as a tool to mark temporal presence, where the line is a fluid open-ended process recording motion in time and space, inspiring her shifts between earth-bound and cosmic temporalities. She is absorbed in the dark universe: black holes, cosmic web, spectra, and in exploring the boundaries between dark and light, invisible and visible, macro and micro.

Katharine Stout, ICA head of programmes, Drawing Room associate director and former curator of contemporary art at Tate, writes that Grisewood 'investigates the in-between spaces, recording through drawings, notes or photographs interventions that capture a moment in time whilst simultaneously tracing its passing'. Identifying her practice of marking time: 'Yet beyond the process-driven undertaking, these works offer a beautiful abstract landscape of sorts, a geological mapping of a moment'.

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Photos (Home and About pages): Nick Manser